Wednesday, 12 December 2018

The Perverse Power of the British Parliament

I cannot help but have a quiet chuckle at the antics of our Members of Parliament.
     In taking full advantage of their powers to keep Theresa in check, do those who voted Remain realise the extent to which they are demonstrating the absolute need to keep the very controls they wish to give away to the bureaucrats in Brussels?
     I would urge both sides in the great debate of Brexit to take stock before taking different paths to achieve the same aim. In reality, this is no more than using the means within their grasp, thus demonstrating how important it is to have this degree of control available to our elected MPs firsthand.
     Being part of a larger trading block is all well and good, but the EU is proving to be intransigent, riven with dissent and run by unelected, quarrelsome uncivil servants who treat the UK as a vassal state. 

Saturday, 24 November 2018

Mummy, I see dead people!

These apparently true events may (or may not) interest you.

     These children all have invisible friends who really existed - and can give details about them that they would have no way of finding out for themselves
     Rosalyn, three, revealed she had 'dead' friends to her mother, Rebecca Evans.
Mrs Evans, a journalist, said she had never talked to her daughter about death.
Records show children with names of 'dead' friends lived at the house in 1800s.
     My three-year-old daughter, Rosalyn, is happily chatting away as we walk through countryside near our home. She is telling me about her morning at pre-school, the games she played and how she wants pasta for dinner, flitting from one subject to another in her usual excitable babble.
     ‘I’ve got a new best friend,’ she announces. ‘How lovely,’ I say. ‘What’s her name?’
     ‘Tilly. She lives in our house,’ comes the reply. ‘She’s my friend, and she’s dead. Alex is my friend, too. He lives here. He died. His mummy and grandad died, too. We play babies together,’ she announces, before moving on to the merits of strawberry ice cream over chocolate.
     I decided to do some digging, in an effort to convince myself that there is nothing to Rosalyn’s imaginings. I wish I hadn’t.
     Census records for 1861 show there was a ten-year-old boy called Alexander Turner living here. And records for 30 years later, in 1891, list a Matilda Oke, aged 20. Records are patchy from this time, so it’s very likely that Matilda was living here when she was much younger.

     Take the mother-of-six Katie Jones, 33, a carer from Canterbury, Kent. She has an 11-year-old daughter Alice, who, from the age of two, has spoken of seeing people who are no longer here. Katie, who is married to landlord Gareth, 47, explains: ‘When Alice was two, she started to cry a lot, saying there were two men in her room staring and shouting at her, and she didn’t like it.
     ‘She then started to say that a girl called Sheila sat at the bottom of her bed crying for her mummy. I looked in old newspaper cuttings and found that there was a girl of that name murdered here. It chilled me to the core.
     ‘Alice then told me that my grandmother, also named Alice, who died a year before my daughter was born, was coming into her bedroom. She said that Nanna had told the girl and the men to go away, and they had.’
Katie says Alice would accurately describe the clothes her grandmother wore, something she couldn’t have known.

Mother-of-two Tricia Jordan is not clairvoyant, but she is in no doubt that her son talks to the dead.
     The 32-year-old medical secretary says her seven-year-old son, Luca, has been ‘seeing’ her dead grandmother since he was a baby, which used to scare her, but she now feels comforted by it.
     Tricia, from Newport, Gwent, who is married to postman Stuart, 37, and also has a four-year-old son, Bobby, says: ‘My grandmother passed away when Luca was 18 months old. He had just started to speak, and the first thing he told me was how Granny would tuck him up in bed. I found it really strange. It used to scare me, and I’d change the subject.
     ‘One of the eeriest things was him singing The Big Ship Sails On The Ally-Ally-O, which she always sang to me. He would sing it over and over, and tell me how Granny was there. I had never sung it to him. There is no way he could have known this song.
‘As time went on, I realised he wasn’t scared so it was all right.’
  
Thinking about it? It makes me wonder.
Want to read more incidents that have been checked?
     See the book The Children That Time Forgot, researched by Peter and Mary Harrison. It’s on Amazon.
     I once had a memorable discussion with my best friend’s mother when I was about five years old, tucked up in bed when she came into my room, where my pal was having a sleepover. She’d died the night before.

Friday, 16 November 2018

Is Chequers really that bad?


To those of you who insist it is, answer with the facts supporting this premise.
     I heard May defending herself yesterday in parliament and heard no inconsistencies whatsoever in her current and previous statements of intent.
      What the draft agreement with the EU supposedly achieves is in line with what Brexit was voted for in the referendum.
      Therefore, the devil must lie in the details, that is to say the small print in what is a lengthy document. What I see happening is nitpicking by her hostile would-be backers in the Tory party. If the intent of the wording is not clear to those who read it, it is because they don’t believe May, the daughter of a vicar, who they fear is being duplicitous and colluding with Barnier and his team.
     I’m happy to dispute these exaggerated interpretations, since they do not bear close inspection. So is May, by the sound of it. She is happy with the way things are going and, to my ears, is sincere in that belief while those around her are losing their sense of proportion.
      If she remains resolute and wins through, time only will tell if she is what she could really be, that is an honest broker. She has the makings of a steely leader. I say this having consistently wanted her to go.


Thursday, 18 October 2018

A double-edged Sword?

The EU representatives are being noticeably obdurate in their determination to create their own army. Why, you may ask yourself?
    Could it be their desire to control internal dissent, especially when it arises in the minnow countries within the union? How would any leader react, given the means, if someone chooses to protect their borders by erecting razor-wire fences? “Send in the troops!” will be the rallying call, to protests that will not be heeded, in the name of unity.
     It will put the already undemocratic EU in the enviable position of not only being directly unelected, it will be in charge of a legitimised weapon-toting force that is akin to an armed gang. Its legitimacy will be legalised by powerful nations like France, hoping to restore itself to its former glory.
     Why is it that physically small men like Napoleon, Putin and Sarkozy seek and attain power so easily? France itself was angry that Poland cancelled the Airbus helicopter deal. Now it wants a European army. Ever wondered why?

Wednesday, 17 October 2018

Review of Future World Rolls! by Literery Titan


Science fiction fans who enjoy lively plots and bigger-than-life characters will find Tumbler’s works meet all of their expectations and more. Tumbler writes beautifully and manages to pull off humor in the most eloquent of ways possible. Some science fiction books are fraught with terminology and processes that overwhelm the reader. Tumbler combats all of that with his stunning cast of characters and an upbeat tone that is set from the first chapter.

Pages: 314 | ASIN: B07H4QQR8K

See full review on

Tuesday, 16 October 2018

The Irish Border Stumbling Block


In the event of no-deal, Britain will be worse off than us, say the Irish nation leaders of less than 5 million good people. I'd be bricking it if I were in their shoes, after their attempts to find other ways to channel their goods ended in failure. They would need to spend billions more if they were forced to break ties with the UK, due to intransigence. The hard border is already there, working remotely, in situ, without the EU needing to do much more that they already have installed. It is a farce, getting huffy and menacing when David Davis clearly laid bare the exaggerations being spouted.
     With friends  and neighbours like these, who needs enemies?

Sunday, 9 September 2018

READ ALL ABOUT IT!

FUTURE WORLD ROLLS! is the second book in the series, Carousels Of Life and is now being published.
It is a Space Opera set to music, much of it fresh. It is packed with zany humor and larger than life characters.
Give it a whirl, I urge you.
Details are emerging on my Bookstall.

Wednesday, 18 July 2018

Exercising self-control over our destiny



Surely it isn't a sin to be a Brexiteer? Is it a bad thing to want your own ELECTED MPs to run your own country? Is it a bad thing when you see the lack of quality in the present rule makers in Brussels? Should we not be given the chance to get rid asap of those who rule us, remotely? I should include those who have vested interests in Europe and are trying to make the Brexit vote invalid and thwart the decision in favour of being ruled from Brussels.

Monday, 2 April 2018

The next time someone hollers, "The NHS is underfunded ..."


Shout it from the rooftops!
News reporting at its best!
Enough to make you sick! Health chiefs put flying lessons, go-karting, five-star hotels and even McDonald’s trips on credit cards... and YOU pay the £5.8million bill
NHS bosses are using taxpayer-funded credit cards to pay for helicopter lessons
Chiefs have racked up expenses of £5.8million in 2 years including on go-karting
The cards were introduced in the nineties, designed to easily fund travel for senior staff, but they have been used in pubs, bowling alleys and McDonald's.
Read it on the grapevine

Sunday, 18 February 2018

A review of Future World Rocks!

By FeedMyBibliodiction
*****
This book was such a fun read!! I’m still relating these interweaving stories to daytime soap operas. Drama is found on every page. I love the imagination used to create some of these alien worlds on (and within) Earth. As current residents of this planet, we’ve barely scratched the surface. There very well could be hidden pockets of civilizations. And then there’s the music. Everybody loves a good rock concert. Music does make the world go ‘round.
     The author has a unique writing style. He shares his story with the reader. There are occasions when he clarifies word meanings and explains why a certain event is told after the other. I found it a bit odd at first, but now it makes me feel like he really is sharing his tale with me.
       I was a bit sad, though. As a supporting character in this story, my friend Mr. Tumbler wasn’t around much. I have grown to think of him as a favorite crazy uncle who spends most of the year adventuring around the world. We don’t see him very often, but when we do, we party like it’s 1999!!
     As I was reading, I was focused on the entertainment aspect of various aliens, humans, time travel, and rock ‘n roll. I also enjoyed finding lyrics mixed into conversations. I would stop, hum a bar or two, and then continue with the story.

     Now that I’ve had a few days to “digest” what I’ve read, I’m wondering if there’s more to this “future world” than the “rock”?? Humans have progressed in technology creating the ability to streamline the world’s economy. Aliens have successfully integrated into society. The government has implemented an invasive “rehab” system for criminals. A “conversation” does take place via songs, but I’m wondering if there is a deeper meaning to some of the selected tunes? Is this our future? Would it be a bad thing? An interesting spin on religion is mentioned...

Should we stay or should we go?

Verhofstadt uses the words 'convergence' and 'divergence' in relation to our imminent departure from the EU. This is his mindset in relation to his perception of reality. It is the opposite of agreeing a relationship that has to be positive in its trading nature. In other words, he sees trade agreements with Canada and Japan as convergent and us, the EU's closest neighbour, as traitorous by nature. This attitude, coming from the former leader of a pygmy country like Belgium, is unhealthy and unhelpful. People like Kinnock, Clegg, Soubry and other Remainers, are grist to his mill and he will play it for all it is worth. Woe betide us if these influential people get their way, when we are on the cusp of an exciting future that precludes paying vast sums into a failing, undemocratic institution.
Should we stay or should we go?
do you really want to know?
With a madman on the prowl
No wonder Barnier wears a scowl

Monday, 29 January 2018

How Angela Merkel RIDICULED Theresa May

But you're leaving - we don't have to make you an offer!': How Angela Merkel RIDICULED Theresa May at private reception in Davos joking that Britain has no idea what it wants from Brexit.

      No Angela, you are wrong. What Britain wants is to leave the EU on terms that treat you and your ilk as friendly neighbours, to whom we extend respect and expect the same in return. It is a mark of David Davis's gentlemanly behaviour that we wish to behave honourably. Clearly, such tokens of his superior upbringing are beyond your comprehension, as they are beyond that of your emissary, Barnier, who Napoleon would surely have described in the same terminology he once applied to Talleyrand, a ‘turd’ in silk stockings. Even Trump was dismissive of May's dealings with the EU as too soft.
     Why oh why do we have to put up with the soft version of Brexit? Perhaps it is because the current generation British politicians are so out of touch with the majority of their own constituents. But there again, we have the meddlesome Gina Miller trying to run the country by proxy, and Blair’s accolytes and apologists making mischief on the continent.

     Sooner rather than later, we need Rees-Mogg to show us his manhood and drawl his way to power as he strikes the fear of God in our enemies, including the knock-kneed Worzel Gummidge act-alike, Jermy Corbyn

Thursday, 25 January 2018

Did Hitler die in his bunker in 1945?

I believed the dental evidence too, until I saw the further traces of his routes out of Berlin and found eye-witness accounts that he escaped and met people, in front of others who recognised him. I now suspect that he actually escaped and the Nazis constructed a plausible, fabricated, mostly burnt partial corpse to convince us otherwise. His escape was meticulously planned and executed. The MI6 and USA released reports state these events as facts, not suppositions.

     General Kaltenbrunner stayed at a cabin called Wildensee high above Altaussee in Austria as a  self-sacrificing act, to divert attention from the true route. Look at the barracks in the Misiones region of Argentina and see traces of stomach medicines and Nazi memorabilia in a totally secluded, self-sustaining site. It all makes sense, plus proof that Bormann died locally, and not in Germany. Irrefutably top-notch men and women led the team doing this research.

Praise be that this madman did not succeed in his frantic last-minute attempts to build and unleash the Atomic bomb on the USA.

Wednesday, 24 January 2018

A review of The Time Slipsters

By 'Feed my Biblio-Diction'
I confess… I have committed the ultimate cardinal sin, especially as a reviewer. I read this third book in The Dreadnought Collective I hope my review does the book justice.
     What an imagination!! I am loving the unique futuristic world created by this high-energy author. He enjoyed taking full advantage of writer privilege, and it shows.
     I love the flexibility of Erdal. As the tour guide, he masterfully solves potential problems before they have the chance to arise. He seems to always be two steps ahead of the group. Then there are the capabilities of their transportation, aptly named The Magic Carpet. It’s just that – magical. Imagine having a voice inexplicably pop into your mind telling you about your ailments.
     I really didn’t care for Wilf, but as Terry pointed out to the others, he did have his uses. His appearance in the book was necessary for certain events to occur. Enough said.
     The alien aspect of this book was a bit weird but interesting. I love the “history” of how the earth was originally populated. Which, of course, naturally leads to why an ancient Roman Senator is in the future requesting Terry’s aid.
     The time travel aspect of the book was unique and true to life. With reenactments occurring all over the world, who would think history witnessed first hand would be anything but actors?

     I thoroughly enjoyed my trip to Turkey with the Tumbler’s and their friends. I now need to read the first two books in the series so I can understand some of the references.

Wednesday, 17 January 2018

A jolly time was had by both of us

A jolly time was had by both of us, particularly me, in the kitchen.
Unwisely, my wife let me loose in the kitchen, after I volunteered to dig out of the freezer a chicken Dhansak that I’d cooked a week earlier, plus a naan bread that I’ve finally mastered baking.
“Yes, it can’t go wrong!” we both thought.
    When she started eating my previously delicious Dhansak, she stuck her tongue out at me, eyes bulging and fanning her primary weapon. At last, I understood what she was indicating when she gasped, “It’s far too hot!”
     It was not obvious at the time, but it had clearly matured in strength by being kept for a short period.
     Guiltily, I carried on eating with my mouth burning.
     “Never mind dear,” I said reassuringly. “I’ve also made you my infallible semolina pudding, sprinkled with vanilla essence and a topping of strawberry jam.”
     I warmed and served it to her in a ramekin. She had a taster and growled at me, “It’s far too salty!” and slapped it down.
     “Rubbish!” I cried. “there’s only sugar in it, not salt!”
     I downed the first spoonful in one go, and suffered instantly by ingesting over a week’s intake of salt all at once. Rushing to the bathroom, I rinsed my mouth under the running tap, saying “Oh dearie me! How is this possible?” It was undoubtedly salt, but had she played a trick on me?
     Then I picked up the plastic container that held the 26 grams of sugar I had used. We both inspected it and dipped a finger in, each of us taking a sample.
     “You idiot!” she shouted, her face screwed up like a monkey’s bottom. “I remember you buying a huge bag of salt 5 years ago and storing it in there.”
     Fortunately, she had to rush off herself and apply water treatment on her own acid tongue.
I don’t think I’ll ever be allowed to forget this minor oversight, but one thing’s for sure: I’ll never, ever again, forget to stick a label on anything, nor store it in the wrong place.
If I’m given the chance.